How long does your sunscreen protect your skin, Tips to avoid skin problems

By  ,  Onlymyhealth editorial team
May 28, 2018
Quick Bites

  • Summer is here and so is the scorching sun, meaning that you have to protect your skin more
  • You would have to put loads of sunscreen in order to protect yourself from developing a lethal type of skin cancer
  • Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells known as melanocytes
  • They are typically caused by UV radiation you get from excess exposure to the sun

Summer is here and so is the scorching sun, meaning that you have to protect your skin more. You would have to put loads of sunscreen in order to protect yourself from developing a lethal type of skin cancer. 

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, Melanoma kills more than 10,000 Americans every year. 

Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells known as melanocytes. They are typically caused by UV radiation you get from excess exposure to the sun.

According to a research, sunscreen can only protect you for two hours after application. Experts have recommended carrying sunscreen (SPF 30-50) with you at all times when you are out in the sun. Here are some other tips to protect your skin in this hot weather: 

Cover up

The Skin Cancer Foundation says that hats and clothing made of dark, tightly woven materials absorb ultraviolet light better than cotton fabrics in lighter shades. Dry fabrics offer more protection than wet ones. Women can select a stylish wide-brimmed hat, and men can choose a bucket hat or a Panama hat to help block the sun. A hat protects the top of your head, where you can’t apply sunscreen, and also offers added protection for your face and neck.

Stay Indoors

The sun's rays are most intense between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Stay indoors during this time, or if you must be outdoors, cover up and wear sunscreen. Consider using an oversized umbrella if you plan to go to the beach this summer. 

Wear Sunglasses

Light-coloured eyes have more sensitivity to the sun’s rays, but everyone should wear sunglasses when the sun shines. Sun damage to the eyes can cause cataracts and pterygium, which block your vision. Make sure to wear glasses that have 99 or 100% UVA and UVB protection and wrap completely around your eyes, to ensure full protection.

Avoid Reflective Surfaces

Be careful around water, snow, or sand. These surfaces reflect the damaging rays of the sun, which can increase the chance of sunburn. Keep in mind that even umbrellas or shade trees provide only moderate protection from ultraviolet light, and they don't protect you from rays reflected off sand, snow, concrete and many other surfaces.

Also Read: Vitamin B3 cuts skin cancer risk, finds study

Avoid Sun-bathing

There is no such thing as a "healthy tan." But while sunbathing is a no-no for everyone, it's an especially bad idea for fair-skinned people. Many of them can't tan anyway and the only risk getting a serious burn. Limit sun exposure between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM, when the sun's rays are the most intense. Practice the shadow rule: if your shadow is shorter than you, the sun's rays are at their strongest, and you should find shade.

More Antioxidants

Eating antioxidants provide some protection against the sun’s rays. Fill up on fruits and vegetables, and drink plenty of green tea this summer for maximum protection for your skin.

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