Study: Watching Too Much TV Can Lead To Heart Disease

According to a recent study, watching too much television can lead to heart disease. Know more.

Navya Kharbanda
Written by: Navya KharbandaPublished at: Jul 16, 2022Updated at: Jul 16, 2022
Study: Watching Too Much TV Can Lead To Heart Disease

According to a recent study, cutting down on our regular television watching could lower our chance of developing heart disease. Dr. Youngwon Kim, an assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong, stated that cutting down on TV watching time should be recognised as a crucial behavioural goal for the prevention of coronary heart disease, regardless of hereditary vulnerability and conventional risk factors. The research was led by a team of scientists at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge and the University of Hong Kong. The study got published in BMC Medicine. 

According to the study, there is a correlation between television viewing and an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Age, sex, smoking habits, food, body mass index, and physical activity are just a few more criteria that are included. One hour or less of TV viewing per day was associated with a 16 percent reduced risk of coronary heart disease than four or more hours, while two to three hours per day was associated with a 6 percent lower risk.

Watching tv cause heart disease

Dr. Youngwon Kim, assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong, said, "Reducing the time spent on watching TV should be recognized as a key behavioral target for prevention of coronary heart disease, irrespective of genetic susceptibility and traditional risk markers." He further added, "Unfavourable levels of these cardiometabolic risk markers may lead to increased risk of developing coronary heart disease." 

Also Read: How Your Blood Group Influences Your Chances At Heart Attack

Dr. Katrien Wijndaele from the MRC Epidemiology Unit, last author of the study, said, "Coronary heart disease is one of the most prominent causes of premature death, so finding ways to help people manage their risk through lifestyle modification is important." One of the main risk factors for coronary heart disease is sedentary lifestyle habits, in simpler words, sitting for longer periods  instead of being physically active. The research was financed by the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong.

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