Study Reveals Walking 8,200 Steps A Day May Lower The Risk Of Chronic Disease

Study suggests that a goal of 8,200 steps a day majorly helps in lowering a person’s risk of chronic health diseases.

Tanya Srivastava
Written by: Tanya SrivastavaUpdated at: Oct 21, 2022 19:45 IST
Study Reveals Walking 8,200 Steps A Day May Lower The Risk Of Chronic Disease

Walking is a great way that helps in improving and maintaining a person's overall health. Exercising everyday in the longer run increases cardiovascular fitness, strengthens bones, reduces excess body fat, and boosts muscle endurance. A recent study adds specificity the understanding of how many steps a person should walk each day to safe guard their health.

The study was led by the researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN. It suggests that a goal of 8,200 steps a day majorly helps in lowering a person’s risk of chronic health diseases.

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Study Reveals Walking 8,200 Steps A Day May Lower The Risk Of Chronic Disease

The researchers used data from fitness trackers. The study also revealed that walking any further continues to increase the benefits of walking. The study’s senior investigator, Dr. Evan L. Brittain, associate professor of medicine at Vanderbilt, told a leading medical website, "For most conditions, higher was better. However, for diabetes and hypertension, we noticed a plateau at around 8 to 9000 steps each day, above which there wasn’t any obvious or relevant benefit. That’s not to say that patients at risk of hypertension and diabetes should at all stop walking or jogging when they reach those levels because there are benefits of activity beyond just those two conditions as well. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) didn’t emerge in our study analysis, probably because there weren’t enough incident CVD diagnoses to reach statistical importance in our rigorous analysis and in this relatively healthy cohort.”

The researchers analysed an average of 4 years of data from 6,042 participants, which were included in the National Institutes of Health’s All of Us study as well. “We were able to find strong connections with several chronic health conditions and diseases. It’s easy to imagine, then, that the relative benefit of increasing activity is likely to be higher in more sedentary patients who have a higher baseline risk of these type of diseases,"  Dr. Brittain noted

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