Study Finds Moderate Or Vigorous Exercise May Boost Heart Health

Researchers have been looking out for ways which will help in reducing the risk of dying from heart failure.

Tanya Srivastava
Written by: Tanya SrivastavaPublished at: Sep 06, 2022Updated at: Sep 06, 2022
Study Finds Moderate Or Vigorous Exercise May Boost Heart Health

Heart diseases are one of the most leading causes of death around the world. Researchers have constantly been looking out for ways which will help in reducing the likelihood of dying from heart failure.

A recent study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation examined the benefits of moderate and vigorous exercise in reducing the risk of heart failure.

Instead of relying on self-reports from the participants, the study utilised data from devices that measure physical activity levels and followed up within six years to accurately check on the participants’ health status.

The American Heart Association (AHA) defines heart failure, as “a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart muscle is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs for blood and oxygen.”

According to the analysis of the study, the adults who performed between 150-300 minutes of moderate physical activity in the week had a 63% reduced risk of heart failure. On the other hand, the adults who logged between 75-150 minutes of vigorous physical activity had a 66% reduction in heart failure risk. Both the groups wore their tracking devices to accuratey track their exercise levels.

Study Finds Moderate Or Vigorous Exercise May Boost Heart Health

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The researchers accessed the participants’ health records to see how their exercise data compared to any incidents of heart failure and found that people who participated in moderate-intensity or vigorous exercise had a reduced risk of heart failure.

“There are several potential ways that regular physical activity may reduce the risk of developing heart failure. For instance, physical activity helps in preventing weight gain and related cardiometabolic conditions, which may include high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes, all of which are risk factors for heart failure,” said co-lead author Prof. Frederick K. Ho, a lecturer in public health at the University of Glasgow in Scotland.

 

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