Poor Sleep Can Increase The Risk Of Fatty Liver Disease, Finds Study

According to a research, poor sleeping pattern and other sedentary lifestyle habits are at a higher risk of fatty liver disease. 

Navya Kharbanda
Written by: Navya KharbandaPublished at: Aug 05, 2022Updated at: Aug 05, 2022
Poor Sleep Can Increase The Risk Of Fatty Liver Disease, Finds Study

According to a recent study, published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, people who have a sedentary lifestyle and poor sleeping pattern can develop fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease is one of the major chronic liver diseases affecting around a quarter of the whole population globally. This liver disease can be caused by metabolic conditions such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Fatty liver disease can worsen and reach at end-stage liver disease, leading to a major health and economic burden on the public.

The researchers conducted this study by examining self-reported sleep patterns in 5,011 Chinese adults suffering from fatty liver disease and found that late night sleep time, snoring and taking naps during daytime for more than 30 minutes are significantly linked to a higher risk of fatty liver disease. Some improvement in sleep quality resulted in 29% lesser risk of fatty liver disease. People who live a sedentary lifestyle and are obesity have more prominent health effects due to poor sleep quality as compared to other people. 

Yan Liu, Ph.D., of the Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health and Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, said, "People with poor nighttime sleep and prolonged daytime napping have the highest risk for developing fatty liver disease." He further added saying, "Our study found a moderate improvement in sleep quality was related to a 29% reduction in the risk for fatty liver disease."

Also read: 6 Ways To Naturally Treat Fatty Liver Disease

Liu said, "Our study provides evidence that even a moderate improvement in sleep quality is sufficient to reduce the risk for fatty liver disease, especially in those with unhealthy lifestyles. Given that large proportions of subjects suffering from poor sleep quality are underdiagnosed and undertreated, our study calls for more research into this field and strategies to improve sleep quality."

The other authors of this study are Jialu Yang, Zhuoyu Zhang, Rui Li, Jingmeng Ju, Shiyun Luo, Jiahua Fan and Min Xia of the Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health and Sun Yat-sen University; and Jichuan Shen, Minying Sun and Wei Zhu from Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Guangzhou, China. The study was funded by the National Key R&D Program of China, Sun Yat-sen University, the Basic Research Project of the Key Laboratory of Guangzhou, the Key Project of Medicine Discipline of Guangzhou, and the Natural Science Foundation of the Guangdong Province.

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