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What is the treatment of Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorders?

By  ,  National Institute of Health
Jan 08, 2013
4.8 / 5(4 Ratings)

Because more studies are needed on the safety and effectiveness of most treatments for jaw joint and muscle disorders, experts strongly recommend using the most conservative, reversible treatments possible. Conservative treatments do not invade the tissues of the face, jaw, or joint, or involve surgery. Reversible treatments do not cause permanent changes in the structure or position of the jaw or teeth. Even when TMJ disorders have become persistent, most patients still do not need aggressive types of treatment.

 

Conservative Treatments


Because the most common jaw joint and muscle problems are temporary and do not get worse, simple treatment is all that is usually needed to relieve discomfort.


Self-Care Practices


There are steps you can take that may be helpful in easing symptoms, such as:

  • eating soft foods,
  • applying ice packs,
  • avoiding extreme jaw movements (such as wide yawning, loud singing, and gum chewing),
  • learning techniques for relaxing and reducing stress,
  • practicing gentle jaw stretching and relaxing exercises that may help increase jaw movement. Your health care provider or a physical therapist can recommend exercises if appropriate for your particular condition.

 

Pain Medications


For many people with TMJ disorders, short-term use of over-the-counter pain medicines or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), such as ibuprofen, may provide temporary relief from jaw discomfort. When necessary, your dentist or doctor can prescribe stronger pain or anti-inflammatory medications, muscle relaxants, or anti-depressants to help ease symptoms.

 

Stabilization Splints


Your doctor or dentist may recommend an oral appliance, also called a stabilization splint or bite guard, which is a plastic guard that fits over the upper or lower teeth. Stabilization splints are the most widely used treatments for TMJ disorders. Studies of their effectiveness in providing pain relief, however, have been inconclusive. If a stabilization splint is recommended, it should be used only for a short time and should not cause permanent changes in the bite. If a splint causes or increases pain, stop using it and see your health care provider.

 

The conservative, reversible treatments described are useful for temporary relief of pain – they are not cures for TMJ disorders. If symptoms continue over time, come back often, or worsen, tell your doctor.

Botox


Botox™ (botulinum toxin type A) is a drug made from the same bacterium that causes food poisoning.  Used in small doses, Botox injections can actually help alleviate some health problems.  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Botox for the treatment of certain eye muscle disorders, cervical dystonia (neck muscle spasms), and severe underarm sweating, as well as for limited cosmetic use.  Botox has not been approved by the FDA for use in TMJ disorders.  Research is under way to learn how Botox specifically affects jaw muscles and their nerves.  The findings will help determine if this drug may be useful in treating TMJ disorders.


 
Irreversible Treatments

 

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