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First Two Weeks of Pregnancy

By  ,  Onlymyhealth editorial team
Aug 23, 2012
4.8 / 5(4 Ratings)
Quick Bites

  • Foetus develops from three layers-endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm
  • During the second week of pregnancy, the foetus would be around .1 to .2 mm in size
  • It floats in the uterus and is protected by the womb lining
  • During the sonograms, you may be able to catch a glimpse of your tiny little angel
  • By the fifth month of your pregnancy, say 20 weeks, gender of the baby becomes noticeable

More

The first and second week of pregnancy is quite early to notice any signs of pregnancy, however, you will test positive for pregnancy (if you haven’t yet). 



first two weeks of pregnancyIt’s the week in which tumultuous hormonal changes begin along with other physical changes. Wondering what bodily changes will develop in the second week? Read on to know.


What to expect in Week 1 and 2 of Pregnancy?


During these weeks, there are no visible changes in your body to notice, however, some women complain to have been plagued by nausea and morning sickness. Apart from these signs, breasts may become slightly tender causing discomfort, though this is likely to happen in the second week.

Your last period can be called period before pregnancy. For the next 42 weeks, you won’t menstruate and your body will prepare itself to nurture a baby. Motherhood along with its responsibilities brings numerous emotional and physical changes. Your utmost agenda during pregnancy should be yours as well as your foetus’ well-being. During pregnancy, the level of female sex hormone, estrogen, increases as it cannot be removed by the body. At times, you will be full of energy and at other times, you may feel tired and fatigued.  

 

Read Pregnancy Week 2


Pregnancy Week 2— Due-date Window


The second week of pregnancy is popularly called the due-date window as it is during this time that your gynaecologist calculates your expecting date or due date.


Baby’s Development in Week 1 and 2 of Pregnancy


Foetus develops from three layers. The first layer develops into baby’s digestive system, liver, pancreas, thyroid and respiratory tract and is called the endoderm. The middle layer called mesoderm develops into bones, cartilage, muscles, genitalia and skin layers. The third and last layer develops into brain, skin, hair and nails of the baby and is known as ectoderm.

During the second week of pregnancy, the foetus would be around .1 to .2 mm in size. It floats in the uterus and is protected by the womb lining. During the sonograms, you may be able to catch a glimpse of your tiny little angel. By the fifth month of your pregnancy, say 20 weeks, gender of the baby becomes noticeable.

 

Read: Baby Development in the Fifth Month


Advice for Pregnancy Week 1 and 2

  • You will find yourself trapped in a vortex of emotions.  At one moment, you’ll be elated and at another, worried on petty issues. This condition is perfectly normal during pregnancy.

  • To uplift your mood at times of turmoil, share your thoughts and feelings with your family members or you may indulge in diary writing. This can help you pour all your emotions and feel calm and relieved.

  • Ask your gynaecologist about the foods to avoid during pregnancy. Start reading books on pregnancy care and motherhood.

Read: Fruits and Vegetables to avoid During Pregnancy

  • Take enough of sleep and let your husband worry about the household chores for a few months.

 

Read more articles on Pregnancy.

 

 

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